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Summer Study: How to Stay on the Ball

July 2, 2015 by

By Julia Dunn on June 26, 2015

This article is brought to you by Uloop and Kaplan.  Search Uloop for student housing, college roommates, sublets, part-time jobs, internships, tutors, and campus news.

Summer is a fantastic opportunity to relax a little more than usual and catch up on leisurely pastimes, but it may also present you with an excess of free time that could be used to exercise your brain and stay up with your academics in a more casual setting.

Even during breaks from school, it is essential to stay on top of your academic plan to ensure you return to your university on track to continue on your major or career pathway in the fall. There are a variety of ways to keep in touch with your academics during summer that are both fun and beneficial to your brain.

So, how can you stay on the ball during … Read full post

What’s on the GRE Part 3: Analytical Writing and Unscored

June 30, 2015 by

The GRE contains 2 essays in an Analytical Writing section, at least 2 Quantitative and 2 Verbal sections, and 1 Experimental or Research section. Testing lasts a total of 4 hours from beginning to end.

Here we’ll explore both the Analytical Writing section and Experimental or Research section in detail.

Analytical Writing

The Analytical Writing section tests both your critical thinking and analytical writing skills. You will be scored on your ability to articulate and support ideas as well as analyze and construct arguments.

It consists of two separately timed tasks:

  • A 30 minute Issue Essay
  • The Issue task presents an opinion on an issue followed by specific instructions on how to respond. You must evaluate the issue and develop an argument with support for your side of the issue.
  • A 30 minute Argument Essay
  • The Argument task requires you to analyze and critique an argument. You must evaluate the
  • Read full post

Study Habits During Netflix: How You Can Use Your Procrastination To Your Advantage

June 25, 2015 by

By Francine Fluetsch on June 18, 2015

This article is brought to you by Uloop and Kaplan.  Search Uloop for student housing, college roommates, sublets, part-time jobs, internships, tutors, and campus news.

Netflix is one of those things that can take us away from being productive for hours, a procrastination tool that we all too often regret and misuse (raise your hand if you’re guilty *raises hand*).

But what if I told you that you could actually use Netflix as a study motivator? Crazy, right? All things are good in moderation, so before you attempt to swear off Netflix for good (trust me honey, you won’t last a week), why not try using Netflix to your advantage?

After class mind break

Procrastination usually stems from attempting to do a lot of work when your brain is already pretty fried (a.k.a. after a long day of classes), so sometimes it’s good … Read full post

What’s on the GRE Part 2: Verbal Section

June 23, 2015 by

The GRE contains 2 essays in an Analytical Writing section, at least 2 Quantitative and 2 Verbal sections, and 1 Unscored Experimental or Research section. Testing lasts a total of 4 hours from beginning to end.

Here we’ll explore the Verbal section in detail.

The Verbal Section

Each Verbal section, broken down into Text Completion (TC), Sentence Equivalence (SE), and Reading Comprehension (RC) question types, has approximately 20 questions to complete in 30 minutes, giving you between 1 and 4 minutes per question, depending on the type.

  • Text Completions
  • TC questions ask you to fill in the blank to complete sentences. Variations include 1-, 2-, and 3-blank questions. You’ll encounter approximately six of these question types in each verbal section, and you should aim to complete each of them at an average of 1–1.5 minutes per question.
  • To master TC questions, work on building your vocabulary, and using context clues.
  • Read full post

Use This Summer Wisely: Start Your Test Prep

June 18, 2015 by

That glorious feeling of summertime freedom is finally here—and though it may be tempting to while away the next few months on a beach blanket, it’s also the perfect time to start your GRE test prep.

Why not put this summer to good use? Get a headstart on your graduate school application by knocking out the most time-consuming and challenging component: the GRE. Your future self will assuredly thank you.

Get your test prep out of the way

Graduate school may still seem a long way off—and maybe it is for you. That’s all the more reason to get the GRE over with. Your GRE score is good for five years, which means starting your test prep this summer can put you ahead even if you’re only going into your junior year of college or looking to gain work experience before graduate school.

You may think it’s more practical … Read full post

What’s on the GRE Part 1: Quantitative Section

June 16, 2015 by

The GRE contains 2 essays in an Analytical Writing section, at least 2 Quantitative and 2 Verbal sections, and 1 unscored Experimental or Research section. Testing lasts a total of 4 hours from beginning to end.

Here we’ll explore the Quantitative section in detail.

The Quantitative Section

Each quantitative section, broken down into Quantitative Comparison (QC) and Problem Solving (PS) question types, has approximately 20 questions to complete in 35 minutes, giving you between 1.5 and 2 minutes per question.

Quantitative Comparisons

  • QC questions ask you to compare 2 quantities—Quantity A and Quantity B—and to identify the relationship between them. You’ll likely see about 7–8 of these in each quant section.

  • To master QC questions, get familiar with shortcut methods that allow you to compare rather than calculate—it tends to be faster.

Problem Solving

  • The most common PS questions are standard multiple choice questions with 5 choices and one correct

  • Read full post

Increasing Productivity in Your Summer GRE Prep

June 11, 2015 by

It’s that time of year—finals have wrapped up and summer is underway. You may be taking this time to relax, but some of you will perhaps be starting a new job or internship, applying to graduate school, or embarking on two to three months of GRE prep.

To help you make the most of your summer, Forbes offers up a fantastic list of “12 Tips For Increasing Productivity.” We found these to be especially relevant to anyone who is preparing for the GRE and hoping to better manage their time before the fall. If you’re taking the summer off instead (lucky you), bookmark this for when the semester begins.

Here’s some highlights from the Forbes list of tips for increasing productivity:

Don’t be afraid to ask for help

While there’s certainly a degree of pride that comes with completing a task on your own, it is rarely the … Read full post

GRE Essay Advice: Get to the Point

June 9, 2015 by

In an earlier post we shared with you some powerful GRE essay advice from a ninth grade English teacher. Unfortunately, not everything that English teachers teach us is useful on the analytical writing section of the GRE.

Avoid the GRE essay funnel

One particularly unhelpful thing you may have learned in grade school English is what’s called the “Funnel Approach.” It works like this: instead of just coming straight out with your thesis in the first paragraph of your GRE essay, you begin with generalities that either provide context or hook the reader and then eventually narrow things down to the point of your essay. First you talk about the universe. Then you talk about the galaxy. Then you bring up our solar system. Finally, you introduce the main point—planet Earth.

Let’s say for example that you’re writing a GRE essay to argue that Monopoly is a terrible board … Read full post

Are Your GRE Prep Expectations Realistic?

June 4, 2015 by

Setting expectations, including those related to your GRE prep, is all a matter of perspective.

If you promise your boss that you’ll complete a project on Wednesday, for example, but don’t end up finishing it until Thursday, you probably shouldn’t expect a pay raise any time soon. If you say you’ll finish the project on Friday but deliver it on Thursday, however, your boss will think you’re amazing.

Don’t set your GRE prep expectations too high

In both of the above scenarios, you’re doing the exact same thing: finishing the project on Thursday. Yet the difference in expectation—a mere two-day difference, no less—will change your boss’s perception of you from slacker to hard worker.

Setting “expectations” may sound like some kind of meaningless corporate platitude—but expectations do matter, especially when it comes to your GRE prep. Equally intelligent, equally dedicated students can succeed wildly or fail horribly depending on … Read full post

What’s a “Good” GRE Score?

June 2, 2015 by

A “good” GRE score is one that gets you accepted into the graduate program of your choice.

That’s the simplest answer to the question, but it begs another: How do you actually achieve a good GRE score and get accepted into the graduate program of your choice?

What you need to know about GRE scores

GRE scoring occurs on a 130–170 scale in each section. This relatively limited range of possible scores means that small improvements in performance can increase your overall score quite a bit. It also means that those little increases to your GRE score can make big differences in your percentile ranking. Sometimes even a one-point increase in score can boost your percentile ranking by as much as five percentage points (check out the test-maker’s chart of percentile rankings).

Remember: your score does not stand alone. Whether or not you are admitted to a graduate program (or … Read full post

 

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